reinforcement

1. An increase of force or strength; denoting specifically the increased sharpness of the patellar reflex when the patient at the same time closes the fist tightly or pulls against the flexed fingers or contracts some other set of muscles. SEE ALSO: Jendrassik maneuver. 2. In dentistry, a structural addition or inclusion used to give additional strength in function; e.g., bars in plastic denture base. 3. In conditioning, the totality of the process in which the conditioned stimulus is followed by presentation of the unconditioned stimulus, which itself elicits the response to be conditioned. SEE ALSO: reinforcer, schedules of r., under schedule, classical conditioning, operant conditioning.
- primary r. satisfaction of physiologic needs or drives, such as that supplied by food or sleep.
- secondary r. r. through something which, while it does not satisfy the need directly, has been associated with direct satisfaction of the need, such as the effect on behavior of a food or beer commercial on television.

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re·in·force·ment .rē-ən-'fōr-smənt, -'fȯr- n the action of causing a subject (as a student or an experimental animal) to learn to give or to increase the frequency of a desired response that in classical conditioning involves the repeated presentation of an unconditioned stimulus (as the sight of food) paired with a conditioned stimulus (as the sound of a bell) and that in operant conditioning involves the use of a reward following a correct response or a punishment following an incorrect response also the reward, punishment, or unconditioned stimulus used in reinforcement compare RECRUITMENT (1)

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n.
(in psychology) the strengthening of a conditioned reflex (see conditioning). In classical conditioning this takes place when a conditioned stimulus is presented at the same time as - or just before - the unconditioned stimulus. In operant conditioning it takes place when a pleasurable event (or reinforcer), such as a reward, follows immediately after some behaviour. The reinforcement schedule governs how often and when such behaviour is rewarded. Different schedules produce different effects on behaviour.

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re·in·force·ment (re″in-forsґmənt) in behavioral science, the presentation of a stimulus following a response that increases the frequency of subsequent responses; see positive r. and negative r.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • reinforcement — UK US /ˌriːɪnˈfɔːsmənt/ noun ► [C or U] the act of making an idea or belief stronger: »The new logo serves as a visual reinforcement of the company s values. ► [C, usually plural] extra people to help with work: »Shops had to call in… …   Financial and business terms

  • Reinforcement — Re in*force ment ( ment), n. See {Re[ e]nforcement}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reinforcement — I noun addition, additional strength, aid, assistance, augmentation, auxiliary, backing, boost, buttress, fresh supply, furtherance, help, helping hand, increase, prop, protection, relief, replenishment, strengthened supplement, supplementum,… …   Law dictionary

  • reinforcement — 1610s, from REINFORCE (Cf. reinforce) + MENT (Cf. ment). Related: Reinforcements …   Etymology dictionary

  • reinforcement — ► NOUN 1) the action or process of reinforcing. 2) (reinforcements) extra personnel sent to strengthen an army or similar force …   English terms dictionary

  • reinforcement — [rē΄in fôrsmənt] n. 1. a reinforcing or being reinforced 2. anything that reinforces 3. [pl.] additional troops, ships, etc. 4. Physiol. Psychol. any action or event that reinforces a response …   English World dictionary

  • Reinforcement — Reinforce redirects here. For the Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha character, see Reinforce (Nanoha). This article is about the term used in operant conditioning. For the construction materials reinforcement, see Rebar. For reinforcement learning in… …   Wikipedia

  • reinforcement — noun 1 supporting/strengthening sth ADJECTIVE ▪ powerful ▪ negative, positive ▪ The children respond well to praise and positive reinforcement. ▪ steel VERB + …   Collocations dictionary

  • reinforcement — re|in|force|ment [ˌri:ınˈfo:smənt US ˈfo:rs ] n 1.) reinforcements [plural] more soldiers, police etc who are sent to a battle, fight etc to make their group stronger ▪ The police called for reinforcements . 2.) positive/negative reinforcement… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • reinforcement — [[t]ri͟ːɪnfɔ͟ː(r)smənt[/t]] reinforcements 1) N PLURAL Reinforcements are soldiers or policemen who are sent to join an army or group of police in order to make it stronger. Mr Vlok promised new measures to protect residents, including the… …   English dictionary

  • Reinforcement — Re|in|force|ment 〈[riınfɔ:smənt] n. 15; unz.; Psych.〉 Bekräftigung des Gewohnten, Erlernten, z. B. durch Belohnung [engl. „Verstärkung, Bestätigung“] * * * Re|in|force|ment [ri:ɪn fɔ:smənt , ri:|ɪn fɔ:smɛnt], das; [engl. reinforcement, zu: to… …   Universal-Lexikon

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