Frozen shoulder

Constant severe limitation of the range of motion of the shoulder due to scarring around the shoulder joint (adhesive capsulitis). Frozen shoulder is an unwanted consequence of rotator cuff disease: damage to the rotator cuff, the set of four tendons that stabilize the shoulder joint and help move the shoulder in diverse directions. Rotator cuff disease can be due to trauma, inflammation or degeneration. The common symptom is pain in the shoulder of gradual or sudden onset, typically located to the front and side of the shoulder, increasing when the shoulder is moved away from the body. (A person with severe tears in the rotator cuff tendons may not be able to hold that arm up). The diagnosis of rotator cuff disease can be objectively confirmed by x-ray, an arthrogram (in which contrast dye is injected into the shoulder joint) or, preferably, an MRI. The treatment of rotator cuff disease depends on the severity of the injury to the rotator cuff. Mild rotator cuff damage is treated with ice, rest, and anti-inflammatory medications (such as ibuprofen and others) and, if needed, a cortisone injection in the rotator cuff. More severe rotator cuff disease may require arthroscopic or open surgical repair. Gradual exercises are important and are specifically designed to strengthen the rotator cuff and increase its range of motion. Rotator cuff disease can leave scarring around the shoulder (adhesive capsulitis) and marked limitation of range of shoulder

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frozen shoulder n a shoulder affected by severe pain, stiffness, and restricted motion called also adhesive capsulitis

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chronic painful stiffness of the shoulder joint. This may follow injury, a stroke, or myocardial infarction or may gradually develop for no apparent reason. Treatment is by gentle stretching and exercises, sometimes combined with corticosteroid injection into the joint. Medical name: adhesive capsulitis.

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popular but misleading term for adhesive capsulitis.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Frozen Shoulder — Klassifikation nach ICD 10 M75.0 Adhäsive Entzündung der Schultergelenkkapsel Frozen shoulder …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • frozen shoulder — noun Medicine chronic painful stiffness of the shoulder joint …   English new terms dictionary

  • frozen shoulder — adhesive capsulitis a well defined disorder characterized by progressive pain and then stiffness of the shoulder that has no clear single cause and usually resolves spontaneously over about 18 months. Initial treatment during the painful… …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • frozen shoulder — noun : a shoulder afflicted with severe pain and stiffening …   Useful english dictionary

  • frozen shoulder — noun The medical disorder adhesive capsulitis …   Wiktionary

  • frozen shoulder — /froʊzən ˈʃoʊldə/ (say frohzuhn shohlduh) noun Medicine Colloquial → capsulitis …   Australian English dictionary

  • Плечо Замороженное (Frozen Shoulder) — хроническая боль и тугоподвижность плечевого сустава. Может возникать в результате травмы, инсульта или инфаркта миокарда или постепенно развиваться без всякой видимой причины. Лечение состоит в осторожном вытяжении руки в этом суставе и… …   Медицинские термины

  • Shoulder problem — Shoulder problems including pain, are one of the more common reasons for physician visits for musculoskeletal symptoms. The shoulder is the most movable joint in the body. However, it is an unstable joint because of the range of motion allowed.… …   Wikipedia

  • Shoulder problems — Shoulder problems, including pain, are one of the more common reasons for physician visits for musculoskeletal symptoms. The shoulder is the most movable joint in the body. However, it is an unstable joint because of the range of motion allowed.… …   Wikipedia

  • Shoulder, frozen — Constant severe limitation of the range of motion of the shoulder due to scarring around the shoulder joint (adhesive capsulitis). Frozen shoulder is an unwanted consequence of rotator cuff disease: damage to the rotator cuff, the set of four… …   Medical dictionary

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