hypothyroidism

Diminished production of thyroid hormone, leading to clinical manifestations of thyroid insufficiency, including low metabolic rate, tendency to weight gain, somnolence and sometimes myxedema. SYN: athyrea (1). [hypo- + G. thyreoeides, thyroid]
- congenital h. lack of thyroid secretion. See infantile h..
- infantile h. can be due to endemic congenital goiter, nonendemic cases are usually due to defective thyroidal embryogenesis, defective hypothalamic-pituitary function, congenital defects in thyroid hormone synthesis or action, or intrauterine exposure to goitrogenic agents. SYN: Brissaud infantilism, congenital myxedema, dysthyroidal infantilism, hypothyroid dwarfism, hypothyroid infantilism, infantile myxedema, myxedematous infantilism.
- secondary h. h. that arises as a consequence of inadequate thyrotropin secretion by the anterior pituitary gland.

* * *

hy·po·thy·roid·ism -.iz-əm n deficient activity of the thyroid gland also a resultant bodily condition characterized by lowered metabolic rate and general loss of vigor

* * *

n.
subnormal activity of the thyroid gland. If present at birth and untreated it leads to cretinism. In adult life it causes mental and physical slowing, undue sensitivity to cold, slowing of the pulse, weight gain, and coarsening of the skin (myxoedema). The condition can be treated by administration of thyroxine.

* * *

hy·po·thy·roid·ism (hi″po-thiґroid-iz-əm) deficiency of thyroid activity, characterized by decrease in basal metabolic rate, fatigue, and lethargy; if untreated, it progresses to myxedema. In adults it is more common in women than men, and in infants it can lead to cretinism. Called also athyria, athyroidism, athyroidosis, hypothyrosis, thyroprivia, and thyroid insufficiency.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hypothyroidism — [hī΄pōthī′roid iz΄əm] n. 1. deficient activity of the thyroid gland 2. the disorder resulting from this, characterized by a retarded rate of metabolism and resulting sluggishness, puffiness, etc …   English World dictionary

  • Hypothyroidism — Infobox Disease Name = Hypothyroidism Caption = Thyroxine (T4) normally produced in 20:1 ratio to triiodothyronine (T3) DiseasesDB = 6558 ICD10 = ICD10|E|03|9|e|00 ICD9 = ICD9|244.9 ICDO = OMIM = MedlinePlus = eMedicineSubj = med eMedicineTopic …   Wikipedia

  • hypothyroidism — hypothyroid, adj. /huy peuh thuy roy diz euhm/, n. Pathol. 1. deficient activity of the thyroid gland. 2. the condition produced by a deficiency of thyroid secretion, resulting in goiter, myxedema, and, in children, cretinism. [1900 05; HYPO +… …   Universalium

  • hypothyroidism — noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1905 deficient activity of the thyroid gland; also a resultant bodily condition characterized by lowered metabolic rate and general loss of vigor …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • hypothyroidism — noun /ˌhaɪpəˈθaɪrɔɪˌdɪzəm/ The disease state caused by insufficient production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid gland …   Wiktionary

  • hypothyroidism — n. underactivity of the thyroid gland (Medicine) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • hypothyroidism — [ˌhʌɪpəʊ θʌɪrɔɪdɪz(ə)m] noun Medicine abnormally low activity of the thyroid gland, resulting in retardation of growth and mental development. Derivatives hypothyroid noun & adjective …   English new terms dictionary

  • hypothyroidism — hy·po·thyroidism …   English syllables

  • hypothyroidism — n. subnormal activity of the thyroid gland. If present at birth and untreated it leads to cretinism. In adult life it causes mental and physical slowing, undue sensitivity to cold, slowing of the pulse, weight gain, and coarsening of the skin… …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • hypothyroidism — hy•po•thy•roid•ism [[t]ˌhaɪ pəˈθaɪ rɔɪˌdɪz əm[/t]] n. 1) pat deficient activity of the thyroid gland 2) pat the condition produced by a deficiency of thyroid secretion, resulting in goiter, myxedema, and, in children, cretinism • Etymology:… …   From formal English to slang

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.