flea

An insect of the order Siphonaptera, marked by lateral compression, sucking mouthparts, extraordinary jumping powers, and ectoparasitic adult life in the hair and feathers of warm-blooded animals. Important fleas include Ctenocephalides felis (cat f.), or C. canis (dog f.), Pulex irritans (human f.), Tunga penetrans (chigger, chigoe, or sand f.), Echidnophaga gallinacea (sticktight f.), Xenopsylla (rat f.), and Ceratophyllus. SEE ALSO: Copepoda.

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flea 'flē n any of the order Siphonaptera comprising wingless bloodsucking insects that have a hard laterally compressed body and legs adapted to leaping and that feed on warm-blooded animals see CAT FLEA, CHIGOE (1), DOG FLEA, RAT FLEA, SAND FLEA, STICKTIGHT FLEA

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n.
a small wingless bloodsucking insect with a laterally compressed body and long legs adapted for jumping. Adult fleas are temporary parasites on birds and mammals and those species that attack humans (Pulex, Xenopsylla, and Nosopsyllus) may be important in the transmission of various diseases. Their bites are not only a nuisance but may become a focus of infection. Appropriate insecticide powders are used to destroy fleas in the home.

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(fle) any insect of the order Siphonaptera; many are parasitic and may act as carriers of disease. Genera of medical importance include Cediopsylla, Ceratophyllus, Ctenocephalides, Ctenophthalmus, Diamanus, Echidnophaga, Hoplopsyllus, Leptopsylla, Monopsyllus, Neopsylla, Nosopsyllus, Oropsylla, Pulex, Rhopalopsyllus, Tunga, and Xenopsylla.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Flea — Michael Balzary Flea sur scène Naissance 16 octobre 1962 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Flea — Flea, n. [OE. fle, flee, AS. fle[ a], fle[ a]h; akin to D. vtoo, OHG. fl[=o]h, G. floh, Icel. fl[=o], Russ. blocha; prob. from the root of E. flee. [root]84. See {Flee}.] (Zo[ o]l.) An insect belonging to the genus {Pulex}, of the order… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • flea — O.E. flea, from P.Gmc. *flauhaz (Cf. O.N. flo, M.Du. vlo, Ger. Floh), perhaps related to O.E. fleon to flee, with a notion of the jumping parasite, or perhaps from PIE *plou flea (Cf. L. pulex, Gk. psylla; see PUCE (Cf …   Etymology dictionary

  • flea — ► NOUN ▪ a small wingless jumping insect which feeds on the blood of mammals and birds. ● (as) fit as a flea Cf. ↑fit as a flea ● a flea in one s ear Cf. ↑a flea in one s ear ORIGIN Old English …   English terms dictionary

  • FLEA — (Heb. פַּרְעֹשׁ, parosh). The flea symbolizes an insignificant, loathsome creature (I Sam. 24:15; 26:20). Nevertheless, the ancients did not refrain from calling themselves parosh, and this was the name of a Judahite family that came with Ezra to …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • flea — [flē] n. [ME fle < OE fleah, akin to Ger floh < same Gmc base as FLEE] 1. any of an order (Siphonaptera) of small, flattened, wingless insects with large legs adapted for jumping: as adults they are bloodsucking parasites on mammals and… …   English World dictionary

  • Flea — (fl[=e]), v. t. [See {Flay}.] To flay. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] He will be fleaed first And horse collars made of s skin. J. Fletcher. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • flea — [fli:] n [: Old English;] 1.) a very small insect without wings that jumps and bites animals and people to eat their blood ▪ Are you sure the dog has fleas ? 2.) send sb off with a flea in their ear BrE to talk angrily to someone, especially… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • flea — [ fli ] noun count a small jumping insect that lives on animals and bites them …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • flea|y — «FLEE ee», adjective. full of fleas: »a fleay kennel …   Useful english dictionary

  • Flea — Michael Peter Balzary, mit Künstlernamen Flea, (* 16. Oktober 1962 in Burwood (Vorort von Melbourne), Australien) ist Bassist der US amerikanischen Crossover/Funk Rock Band Red Hot Chili Peppers, Studio Musiker und Gelegenheitsschauspieler.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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