Cord, vocal


Cord, vocal
: One of two small bands of muscle within the larynx. These muscles vibrate to produce the voice. The vocal cords form a "V" inside the larynx, a 2-inch-long tube-shaped organ in the neck: {{}}We use the larynx when we breathe, talk, or swallow. Its outer wall of cartilage forms the area of the front of the neck referred to as the "Adams apple." Each time we inhale (breathe in), air goes into our nose or mouth, then through the larynx, down the trachea, and into our lungs. When we exhale (breathe out), the air goes the other way. When we breathe, the vocal cords relax and air moves through the space between them without making sound. When we talk, the vocal cords tighten up and move closer together. Air from the lungs is forced between them and makes them vibrate, producing the sound of our voice. The tongue, lips, and teeth form this sound into words. The larynx is also sometimes called the voice box.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • cord — [kôrd] n. [ME & OFr corde < L chorda < Gr chordē, catgut, chord, cord < IE base * gher , intestine > YARN] 1. a thick string or thin rope 2. any force acting as a tie or bond 3. [from use of a cord in measuring] a measure of wood cut… …   English World dictionary

  • Cord — Short and informal reference to the spinal cord, the major column of nerve tissue that is connected to the brain, lies within the vertebral canal, and from which the spinal nerves emerge. The spinal cord and the brain constitute the central… …   Medical dictionary

  • vocal band — noun either of two pairs of folds of mucous membrane projecting into the larynx • Syn: ↑vocal cord, ↑vocal fold, ↑plica vocalis • Hypernyms: ↑fold, ↑plica • Hyponyms: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • vocal fold — noun either of two pairs of folds of mucous membrane projecting into the larynx • Syn: ↑vocal cord, ↑vocal band, ↑plica vocalis • Hypernyms: ↑fold, ↑plica • Hyponyms: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • cord — cord1 [ko:d US ko:rd] n [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: corde, from Latin chorda string , from Greek chorde] 1.) [U and C] a piece of thick string or thin rope ▪ The robe was held at the waist by a cord. ▪ He pulled explosives and some… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • cord — 1 noun 1 (C, U) a piece of thick string or thin rope: We need some cord to hang the picture. | He pulled explosives and some tangled cord from his bag. 2 cords (plural) trousers made from a thick strong cotton cloth with thin raised lines on it 3 …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • cord — [[t]kɔ͟ː(r)d[/t]] cords 1) N VAR Cord is strong, thick string. The door had been tied shut with a length of nylon cord. ...gilded cords and tassels. 2) N VAR Cord is wire covered in rubber or plastic which connects electrical equipment to an… …   English dictionary

  • cord — chord, cord 1. Although we are dealing here with three English words, their histories are very much intertwined, and their ultimate origin is in the Latin word chorda which has several meanings. To begin with, there are two distinct words spelt… …   Modern English usage

  • cord — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. string, rope, band, bond, twine; tendon; cable. See filament, connection. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [Twine] Syn. string, cordage, fiber; see rope . 2. [A tendon] Syn. sinew, ligament, vinculum, thew,… …   English dictionary for students

  • Vocal fold nodule — Vocal cord nodule Classification and external resources Histopathologic image of vocal fold nodule or polyp. Biopsy specimen. H E stain. ICD 10 J …   Wikipedia


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